To LMS or Not To LMS…

science-1182713_1280

CC Image via Pixabay by markmags

Let’s move beyond the LMS, back to and forward to an independent Web and let’s help our students take full advantage of it. (Audrey Watters)

Whoa, whoa, whoa… let’s back up a moment here. “Let’s move beyond the LMS”… how about we first realize that most educators in Saskatchewan aren’t even aware of what an LMS is! Heck, most of Saskatchewan’s educators are still “digital visitors” (My Dad, Web 0.1) and may just be getting used to the idea of how technology and learning management systems (LMS) can be integrated in to their classrooms.

That being said, I am not one of those teachers. I value the way that technology can enhance learning outcomes and how students can use technology in varieties of ways to express their learning.  This is where an LMS comes in handy.

My first choice of LMS is Google Classroom. The reason being, this is what is supported in my school division, so when I am in need of assistance when using Classroom, I have tech support that can help me. As Jessica pointed out in her blog, Google Classroom is one of the platforms that are really geared for ease of use and has lots of support in terms of teachers that are already mastering this platform. So this LMS is already top of mind when it comes integrating it in to the classroom.

tablet-1910019_1280

CC image via Pixabay by Wokandapix

Although we were asked to explore different LMS platfoms this week, I feel that if my division is already supporting one particular LMS platform, then I should be mastering it over learning a new one. And, after hearing the different reviews of fellow classmates reviewing LMS platforms (such as Canvas), I feel that, especially in an elementary setting, these other types of platforms are not cohesive to the needs of my students. Kirsten summed up my feelings nicely: it’s another LMS system to have to learn, where I am already comfortable with the one that I am already using.

So, what are my thoughts on Google Classroom as an LMS platform as an itinerant teacher in elementary schools? I fall back to Bates questions he posed regarding Technology Based Education (9.1.3) and adapt them to how I wish to use Classroom for my students:

questions

Here is how I would answer such questions:

  • I need and want to offer a program that supports all types of learners needs, especially when I am not always in the classroom with the students. And because it is a split grade group, I need to cover all curricular content for both grades. Google Classroom allows for independent learning and teacher led learning.
  • Factors that influence my decision on Google Classroom are:
    • It’s supported by our division
    • Chromebook carts so that students have instant access to it
    • Ease of use
    • Used from class to class, grade to grade (continuity)
  • Because students can easily access assignments and lessons online via Google Classroom, the role of classroom teaching becomes more open. For example, at my school, we tend to have a large population of students who go on extended vacations or visits to home countries. Parents always ask about “taking homework” to work on. With Google Classroom, students will always have access to assignments and be able to turn them in. As another example, an LMS platform like Google Classroom allows students to always have access to their work. No more forgotten assignments at home, or lost papers.
  • The question of the role of the educator can be addressed in all aspects of open and free access. The role of the educator has only shifted slightly. In elementary schools, educators still need to teach students to “find” appropriate and proper information on the free Web and analyze it critically. Educators must also teach students about how to use technology to enhance their learning.
  • When it comes to creating resources and using free resources, I am a believer that both could be one in the same. I don’t know why some teachers feel the need to re-invent the wheel, if what you need already exists. And, when using free resources, adapt it based on the needs of your students. However, should you have to create something, share it- there is always someone else out there who is also looking for it. In this case, an LMS is not necessarily the tool to use for sharing, but other professional LMS-like tools exist. Social media sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, provide many user groups to share and discuss.
  • The final question would apply, in my opinion, more to University teachers who are interested in MOOCs. As an elementary teacher, the need for me to create an open class for students in Grades 5 or 6 isn’t really a reality as of yet. I would open my lessons to my students who would be absent from class for reasons beyond my control so that they would have access to the lessons happening. However, opening it up to the entire world would require more thought and planning. Too many factors over privacy would come in to play, especially when working with minors.

When considering Bates description of Online Learning Environments in Chapter 6, he describes it as:

LMSs provide an online teaching environment, where content can be loaded and organized, as well as providing ‘spaces’ for learning objectives, student activities, assignment questions, and discussion forums.

I feel that Google Classroom does just this. Content is loaded on to students personal platforms based on classroom subjects and organized based on assignments. It provides multiple tools of learning (whether creating an assignment, posing a question for discussion or providing information) and also allows for immediate feedback between teachers and students.

20726835870_d33df27d3f_b

CC Image via Flickr by Wesley Fryer

Roxanne put it quite perfectly when she summed up that an LMS platform, such as Google Classroom, can

encourage students to be independent learners and to help them realize that technology can be beneficial to their education.

However, it can also be beneficial to educators who are looking to enhance learning opportunities for their students as well as themselves.

Advertisements

One thought on “To LMS or Not To LMS…

  1. Pingback: Yay or Nay to LMS? – Jennifer Huber's Blog

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s